‘Psychologically scarred’ millennials are killing countless industries from napkins to Applebee’s — here are the businesses they like the least


Buffalo Wild Wings on Facebook

Millennials’ preferences are killing dozens of industries.

There are many complex reasons millennials’ preferences differ from prior generations’, including less financial stability and memories of growing up during the recession.

“I think we have got a very significant psychological scar from this great recession,” Morgan Stanley analyst Kimberly Greenberger told Business Insider.

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Here are 19 things millennials are killing.

Casual dining chains like Buffalo Wild Wings and Applebee’s
Wikimedia Commons

Brands such as Buffalo Wild Wings, Ruby Tuesday, and Applebee’s have faced sales slumps and dozens of restaurant closings as casual-dining chains have struggled to attract customers and increase sales.

In August, Applebee’s announced it would close up to 135 restaurants, in part because it focused too much on winning over millennials and forgot its “Middle America roots.” 

“Millennial consumers are more attracted than their elders to cooking at home, ordering delivery from restaurants, and eating quickly, in fast-casual or quick-serve restaurants,” Buffalo Wild Wings CEO Sally Smith wrote in a letter to shareholders earlier this year.


The concept of “starter homes” — they’re renting longer and buying expensive houses later

Contrary to popular belief, millennials are interested in purchasing homes. They’re just waiting longer to buy.

September report from the real-estate website and app Zillow found that millennials — i.e., people between the ages of 18 and 34 — are the largest group of homebuyers in the US. (The median age of a homebuyer is 36.)

Spencer Rascoff, Zillow’s CEO, has some insight into why millennials are delaying their first home purchases. On an episode of Business Insider’s podcast, “Success! How I Did It,” Rascoff broke it down for our US editor-in-chief, Alyson Shontell:

“As a result of limited starter-home inventory, they’re renting longer. And when they buy their first home, they’re buying a much nicer home than a prior generation,” he said.

“I mean, many people are basically skipping starter homes; they’re renting until their 30s, and that first house they buy is a million dollars, and they just are not even buying the $200,000, $300,000, $400,000 home, which is a total mind shift as compared with previous generations. So they’re still buying homes — they’re just buying them later and buying them bigger.”

The Great American Beer Festival

In late July, Goldman Sachs downgraded both Boston Beer Company and Constellation Brands based on data suggesting that younger consumers prefer wine and spirits to beer, as well as the fact that they’re drinking less alcohol than older generations more generally.

Beer penetration fell 1% from 2016 to 2017 in the US market, while both wine and spirits were unmoved, according to Nielsen ratings. 

While some argue that calling a 1% drop in penetration a beer-industry homicide case is an overreaction, small shifts have a huge financial impact on beer industry giants. Beer already lost 10% of market share to wine and hard liquor from 2006 to 2016.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider